Take Action to Combat Anti-Semitism in Europe

The rise of anti-Semitism in Europe that threatens not only Jews but also democratic society as a whole, has brought numerous attacks on Jewish individuals and Jewish institutions, including synagogues. Congress can combat the rise in such hate crimes by supporting S.198, the Combating European Anti-Semitism Act.

This bill requires enhanced reporting to Congress on anti-Semitic incidents in Europe, and encourages the State Department to discuss with European governments the urgent need to adopt a working definition of anti-Semitism. Urging passage of S.198 will send a strong signal of support to vulnerable European Jewish communities.

Add your name and information on the right to take action.

 

Email Your Senators
Your Message
Combating European Anti-Semitism Act
Dear (recipient name),

As your constituent, I am writing to ask you to support S.198, the Combating European Anti-Semitism Act of 2017. The rise of anti-Semitism in Europe that threatens Jews and democratic society as a whole has brought numerous attacks on Jewish individuals and Jewish institutions – some examples being a synagogue firebombed in Gothenburg, windows of a Jewish business shattered in Amsterdam, raging anti-Semitic protests on the streets of Berlin and Malmö, and the horrific murders of Jewish individuals in France – including 85-year-old Holocaust survivor Mireille Knoll. While there is also renewed concern about anti-Semitism in the U.S., ongoing systemic dangers threaten the security of European Jewish communities.

S.198 requires enhanced reporting to Congress on anti-Semitic incidents in Europe; the safety and security of European Jewish communities; and the efforts of the United States to partner with European governments, the European Union, and civil society to combat anti-Semitism. Introduced by Senators Rubio and Kaine, S.198 has original support from Senators Gardner, Menendez, Perdue, Nelson, Boozman, Blumenthal, Lankford, Brown, and Schatz. Companion legislation, H.R.672, passed the House of Representatives on May 17, 2017.

In addition to the reporting requirement, S.198 also encourages the State Department to work with European governments and multilateral institutions to adopt a working definition of anti-Semitism. In 2016, the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) adopted such a working definition based on the 2005 European Monitoring Centre Working Definition. It offers a clear and comprehensive description of anti-Semitism in its various forms, including hatred and discrimination against Jews, Holocaust denial, and anti-Semitism related to Israel. A shared, internationally accepted definition of anti-Semitism will strengthen the ability of nations to identify, measure, and combat this senseless hate.

At a time when it is vitally necessary to reaffirm our commitment to combating anti-Semitism at home and abroad, the U.S. is well-positioned to have a significant impact. Passage of the Combating European Anti-Semitism Act will send a powerful message that this is a critical priority for the United States, as anti-Semitism is antithetical to the fundamental values shared by the U.S. and our partners.

Thank you for considering my views on the matter.

Sincerely,

[First Name] [Last Name]